May 31, 2020

Anti-racism

Anti-racism

I should’ve made this post a long time ago. I acknowledge and admit that. So I’m here now, showing up to do this work that is so desperately needed. To unlearn and relearn. Especially as someone going into healthcare, realizing that these inequities exist in ALL structures. And incorporating these teachings into not only healthcare but every day life is absolutely necessary. A list of resources (continually growing) below.

Donations

  • The LoveLand Foundation: The Loveland Foundation is the official continuation of this effort to bring opportunity and healing to communities of color, and especially to Black women and girls. Through fellowships, residency programs, listening tours, and more, ultimately we hope to contribute to both the empowerment and the liberation of the communities we serve.
    • you can either donate directly or form a giving circle with 6 friends. to donate and support Black women and girls who deserve access to healing. If each of your friends contribute $20, it will cover 1 therapy session.
  • You Good, Sis? – a collective for the black/brown individuals looking for a mental/spiritual/physical check in aimed to make the virtual wellness space more inclusive. Co-founded by Rachael and Jaylee.
  • ACLU NationwideThe ACLU dares to create a more perfect union — beyond one person, party, or side. Our mission is to realize this promise of the United States Constitution for all and expand the reach of its guarantees.
  • Campaign Zero: an agenda to end police violence by implementing research-based policy solutions at every level of government. Donate here.
  • George Floyd Memorial on GoFundMe in honor of George Floyd
  • Louisville Bail Fund – The Louisville Community Bail Fund exists to not only bail out folks, but provide post-release support to get them from jail, fed, and to a situation of safety. LCBF also maintains a focus on preventative measures for those targeted by law enforcement and threatened with incarceration.
  • Reclaim the Block: “Reclaim the Block began in 2018 and organizes Minneapolis community and city council members to move money from the police department into other areas of the city’s budget that truly promote community health and safety. We believe health, safety and resiliency exist without police of any kind. We organize around policies that strengthen community-led safety initiatives and reduce reliance on police departments. We do not believe that increased regulation of or public engagement with the police will lead to safer communities, as community testimony and documented police conduct suggest otherwise.”
  • Minnesota Freedom Fund: The Minnesota Freedom Fund pays criminal bail and immigration bond for those who cannot afford to as we seek to end discriminatory, coercive, and oppressive jailing.
  • Black Visions Collective: Through the development of powerful strategic campaigns, we seek to expand the power of Black people across the Twin Cities metro area and Minnesota. This can look like delivering mobilization and action goals as part of a national coalition in which Black lives are centered, but it most often looks like visioning and leading targeted collaborative local campaigns that advance a concrete impact for people’s lives here, while also advancing a shift in public narrative that connects to transformative long-term change. Donate here.
  • Find a list of Bail Funds separated by city here

Literature

Online Courses

  • Rachel Ricketts: Spiritual Activism 101 – curated discussion and education on anti-racism, internalized oppression and addressing whiteness/white supremacy; space to share our hurts/struggles/frustration regarding race, gender and it’s intersections; intentional journalling to unpack our blind spots; spiritual tools + practices to assist in committing to anti-racism + inclusion; guided meditation + transformational breathwork to release and let go.
    • She also has ways for you to be updated every month with Patreon donations. With your $10/month donation, you’ll receive once-monthly exclusive contribution such as a Q+A, meditation for moving through challenging times, breathwork session, prompts for deepening your racial justice/anti-oppression work or the like! Requests for specific offerings are accepted monthly!
    • She also accepts remunerations through PayPal
    • Instagram
  • Rachel Cargle:
    • Unpacking White Feminism – Rachel explores the history of feminism through the lens of race. In the course you will uncover layers of unlearned details, reveal the problematic effects that white centered activism has had on the past and present of the feminism movement and action items you can take to be more intentional and inclusive
    • The Great Unlearn: access to many amazing resources with Patreon subscription
    • Instagram
  • Monique Melton – Anti-racism 101 “crash course” – In this approximately 90-minute class, Monique explores anti-racism; what it is, where to start and common mistakes to avoid.
  • Free resource provided by Rachel Rodgers on how to create diversity within your online business 

Healthcare

Videos

Videos

Books

Books

Articles

Articles

  • The sources in this article, called “Racism and discrimination in health care: Providers and patients”
  • This article, called “Race: A Starting Place”
  • This article, called “40 Years of Human Experimentation in America: The Tuskegee Study”
  • This article, called “The Disturbing History of African-Americans and Medical Research Goes Beyond Henrietta Lacks”
  • This article, called “Structural racism and health inequities in the USA: evidence and interventions”
  • This article, called Race and Medicine: The Harm That Comes From Mistrust
  • This article, called “The Costs of Racial Disparities in Health Care”

Other resources

Other resources

  • This whole document!!! An excellent resource to sift through from Healthcare Huddle. It has categories in research, diagnostics, maternal/infant mortality, healthcare workforce, mental health, and even heart health, diabetes, and COVID-19.
  • This whole page on Harvard Public Health’s website has a few great articles
  • a list of resources for a more inclusive work place/space here from Harvard School of Public Health
  • many resources in this blog post from the Community Health Training Institute
  • will continue to update this section, specifically regarding articles, online courses, trainings, CME opportunity etc.

Podcasts

  • Let’s Talk about it by Taylor Nolan – especially the episode called White People
  • #TellBlackStories
  • Still Processing
  • Good Ancestor Podcast
  • Scene on Radio: Seeing White
  • Code Switch
  • Facing Ourselves
  • 1619

Films / Documentaries

  • 13th (documentary on Netflix): Filmmaker Ava DuVernay explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation’s prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans.
  • The Innocence Files (Docuseries on Netflix): The untold personal stories behind eight cases of wrongful conviction that the Innocence Project and organizations within the Innocence Network have uncovered and worked to overturn.
  • Freedom Riders: (documentary available on Amazon) – tells the story of over 400 Black and white Americans who risked their lives to challenge the segregated interstate travel system. They spent six months deliberately violating Jim Crow laws (enduring beatings and imprisonment) by traveling together on buses and trains through the Deep South. 
  • Slavery by Another Name: 90-minute documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. The film tells how even as chattel slavery came to an end in the South in 1865, thousands of African Americans were pulled back into forced labor with shocking force and brutality. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold, and coerced to do the bidding of masters. Tolerated by both the North and South, forced labor lasted well into the 20th century. Available free here.
  • When They See Us (series on Netflix): a four-part series premiering May 31 on Netflix directed by Ava DuVernay, is based on the lives of five men who were wrongfully convicted and sent to prison as teenagers for gang-raping and nearly killing Trisha Meili, a woman who was jogging in Central Park in 1989.
  • Dear White People (series on Netflix): Netflix-original series follows a group of students of color at Winchester University, a predominantly white Ivy League college. The students are faced with a landscape of cultural bias, social injustice, misguided activism and slippery politics. Through an absurdist lens, the series uses irony, self-deprecation, brutal honesty and humor to highlight issues that still plague today’s”post-racial” society.
  • The Hate U Give (film on Hulu): Starr Carter is constantly switching between two worlds — the poor, mostly black neighborhood where she lives and the wealthy, mostly white prep school that she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is soon shattered when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend at the hands of a police officer. Facing pressure from all sides of the community, Starr must find her voice and decide to stand up for what’s right.
  • American Son (film on Netflix): An estranged couple reunite in a Florida police station to help find their missing teenage son.

Instagram Accounts

More pages with lists of resources

With all of these resources, you can take the 21-day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge – committing to doing one action to further your understanding of power, privilege, supremacy, oppression, and equity. Read more about that with tons of resources here.

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